Super Indie Update – Crowd Funding: How Much is too Much?


*PLEASE READ* In no way is this an attack on the video game industry, Kickstarter, or crowd funding in general and I think David Crane is no doubt a huge inspiration. I’m merely asking whether or not a line should be drawn when funding things that don’t exist. Should there be regulations? Higher expectations? Guarantees from the people getting the money? A person or company can take as much crowd funded money as they want and never have to give anything back in return. Is an idea worth $900000? Again, I’m simply putting this out there to get people thinking. Please leave your comments below and let’s have a civil debate. Check out David Crane’s Jungle Adventure: www.kickstarter.com Follow me on Twitter for all of the updates: www.twitter.com Like my Facebook Page for exclusive videos: www.facebook.com Instagram: @JoshMattingly Intro and end Music by Hige Driver: higedriver.com “indie statik” “indie games” pitfall kickstarter “david cranes jungle adventure” david cranes jungle adventure crowdfunding “crowd funding” “indie game” “indie game funding” “indie game kickstarter”

24 Responses to “Super Indie Update – Crowd Funding: How Much is too Much?”

  1. VlPmsg  on December 23rd, 2012

    For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through Him - JESUS CHRIST CAN SAVE YOU – Open Your Heart

    Reply

  2. Maximillioneddy2011  on December 23rd, 2012

    Join Crowdfunding as investor here goo. gl / GFYrR (remove the space)

    earn from your investment with project u r interested. Register today and start investing.

    Reply

  3. spino4951  on December 23rd, 2012

    That might be a little…much. I feel like more information is needed, but I love the idea of a new, platformer.

    Reply

  4. Willibef  on December 23rd, 2012

    Why shouldn’t one be critical about the game industry? This kind of approach deserves to be appreciated.

    Reply

  5. Xuhybrid  on December 23rd, 2012

    He doesn’t need all that money because he’s not making an “independent game”. The only reason he thinks he needs all that money is because he would ask the same froma big name publisher so he is used to that. Honestly, i think he needs to be rejected on Kickstarter because that guy is obviously rich already and is just trying to milk the people. I mean, he doesn’t even have a prototype, just a couple pictures. Its pathetic.

    Reply

  6. scallhero  on December 23rd, 2012

    WHY U NO MAKE NEW VIDEOS!!?

    Hope everything is okay with you, get a video up soon!

    Reply

  7. GrumpyLandshark  on December 23rd, 2012

    Where be’eth thou, O Joshua?

    Reply

  8. adhominems  on December 23rd, 2012

    i feel stupid for not noticing this earlier that your intro music is Ukigumo.

    Reply

  9. turbo409  on December 23rd, 2012

    I believe the majority of the people agree with you Josh, as it only raised just over 20k of 950k w 20 days left to go. So it does not look like people are wanting to take a chance on this one.
    But it is cool that people could take a chance on it if they wanted to.

    Reply

  10. MsSomeonenew  on December 23rd, 2012

    Well yes a bunch of students can do this on ramen money but they also fall short on quality and content, so if we want the full extent of this mans project then the goal is reasonable (games do cost a lot to make).

    HOWEVER he did not tell us what the project is, any half decent garage dev comes to kickstarter with a fleshed out plan, but not the big boys… no they ask money simply for their name, now that is a very nasty thing to do and for professionals a downright astounding lack of ethics.

    Reply

  11. SkeletorOnline  on December 23rd, 2012

    I was half hoping that ouya would actually just be a scam because so many people had kickstarters (before it was even funded!!) for games being developed on ouya… Anyways… Tim Schafer is one thing David Crane is not that same thing…

    Reply

  12. SJmapler  on December 23rd, 2012

    to elaborate I don’t think this project in particular is meant to burn money but it should show that he may or may not have direction

    Reply

  13. SJmapler  on December 23rd, 2012

    If people don’t see 900,000 dollars people won’t give 900,000 dollars. I don’t think too many people can just go “gimme moneys n I do non-specific action but have general idea” (even David Crane) and receive it. He won’t get a cent if he doesn’t make it and people must willingly commit to what he’s presented. Nobody can abuse the system unless people agree to join such a scam, and that’s the beauty it’s the people’s will. Not saying people won’t make mistakes but I think it’s mostly scam-proof.

    Reply

  14. gavvatar  on December 23rd, 2012

    I do agree on you with a lot of points. Their video tells you practically nothing about the game.. It does look pretty much like a pitfall reboot, Kickstarter does have some fail safes against you losing your money. If the game doesn’t reach it’s funding goal everyone who has donated will get their money back. Kickstarter can be good too. Planetary Annihilation’s (A really awesome looking Total Annihilation spiritual successor) primary goal is also $900,000 but is more than an idea.

    Reply

  15. thegyger  on December 23rd, 2012

    Ya, it feels totally sleazy ;)

    Reply

  16. Shinziga  on December 23rd, 2012

    I totally agree with your arguments and your point of view. If a company or a developer uses kickstarter to fund their projects, you need to be transparant in certain ways. Answer certain questions and present yourself in a honest way. Give something in return is not much to asked when you fund 10.000, at least a pitfall outfit with behind the scenes game design and concept art, is that much to ask?

    Reply

  17. rybram  on December 23rd, 2012

    Co-founder of Activision looking for crowd funding hahaha  Come on gtfo really?

    Reply

  18. Kathanis2068  on December 23rd, 2012

    Indie, I love you. You approach this with such class and level headedness(not a word, but oh well :P ) and you can talk about it calmly and make us as people think because you aren’t shoving one side of the argument down our throats, you’re shoving both!(in a good way) I for one completely agree with you and I would love to see more “controversial” videos like this! Keep up the good work :)

    Reply

  19. johnvs1  on December 23rd, 2012

    I agree with you to an extent – the lack of controls to guarantee a delivered product are concerning. Though, I assume courtrooms will eventually be the answer to that. On the quality question – businesses hedge against risk all the time through traditional funding, and as a consumer we take the risk of a bad product every time we consume anything. If a creator is not capable of taking the risk, are you suggesting they do not create? Sounds like an argument against crowd-funding in general.

    Reply

  20. torchrunner211  on December 23rd, 2012

    With that being said, I browse all kinds of game development process blogs scoping out potential purchases, and that doesn’t cost me a dime. But it’s that free sharing of information and the labor of love they embody through those blogs that makes me want to spend my hard earned cash when it comes out.
    I apologize for the spam!

    Reply

  21. torchrunner211  on December 23rd, 2012

    After reading Crane’s and Josh’s comments I’ve recognized this argument is between a finished corporate funded and designed product versus an unfinished independent crowd funded and designed product. The line between the two is blurring since companies are releasing DLC to ensure the “complete package” and indies are asking for salary-pushing budgets. It all comes back to the consumer, and whether you buy a company game or fund an indie kickstarter you take a risk with your wallet.

    Reply

  22. wtothez  on December 23rd, 2012

    Hey, thanks for the concern on the future of this idea. I would like to say my thoughts on it but a while back, TB and Jesse talk about what I had in mind. It was somewhere in TGS podcast but point is Kickstarter should be the one to put the label on this situation. Are the people investings or donating? Once the line is set then it would be easier to talk about it. For now, it’s all a mesh up place to even talk about.

    Reply

  23. IndieStatik  on December 23rd, 2012

    You don’t thinks its strange that if someone wanted to, they could come up with a great idea, get a million dollars and then provide literally nothing in return? There are no guarantees on any of it. I was simply asking WHAT we are getting. As an exploit, its a business avoiding the RISK in creating something. A dev’s game can suck and not sell at all but there’s no risk to them financially. Yes, as a donor, you risk that the game could suck too. But is that our responsibility?

    Reply

  24. IndieStatik  on December 23rd, 2012

    I think you’re probably a really great guy who was just caught off guard by my real, business related questions. I’m not attacking you or your game and if it gets made, I will buy a copy and give it an unbiased review on my channel.

    Reply


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