Les Crane – Desiderata (1972)


UK hit in 1972, pictures from Lake District, Cumbria, England.

25 Responses to “Les Crane – Desiderata (1972)”

  1. aledbutcha  on June 3rd, 2011

    Brilliant! Kind of reminds me of that “Wear Sunscreen” tune.
    Any chance that you could upload the B side to this? Its called ” A Different Drummer”.

    Pretty please?

    Reply

  2. TECHNICIAN4U  on June 3rd, 2011

    A truly timeless song with a pretty melody. An album version is available as well. A TOP 10 song in the USA from OCTOBER 1971 reaching #8, and on the charts for 10 weeks. Les won a Grammy Award for this recording. WELL deserved too!

    It’s sad to think this song is never heard anymore; the younger people are really missing out. I was 15 then. Thanks for posting this one of a kind song.

    Reply

  3. Stemax1960  on June 3rd, 2011

    I would implore everyone to listen to the words and heed the message.

    Reply

  4. group4taker  on June 3rd, 2011

    Always loved this track, perhaps the best ever version, lots of truth in the words,
    The video work is really good too, well put together….well done on both…

    Reply

  5. group4taker  on June 3rd, 2011

    Always loved this track, lots of truth in the words,
    The video work is really good too, well put together….well done on both…

    Reply

  6. KringleOfBorg  on June 3rd, 2011

    @ mccray916: In August 1971, the poem was published in Success Unlimited magazine, again without authorization from Ehrmann’s family. This led to a lawsuit against the magazine’s publisher, Combined Registry Company. In 1976, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the copyright for the poem had been forfeited due to the poem’s authorized publication in the 1940s without a copyright notice. Thus the court ruled that the poem is, in fact, in the public domain. – wikipedia

    Reply

  7. Annie1962  on June 3rd, 2011

    @mnestrt m yeah you have a point there, thanks for that.

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  8. mnestrt  on June 3rd, 2011

    @Annie1962 I agree with you but I think that what the author meant is that if we measure ourselves against others, in our own eyes we will perceive them to be either lesser or greater than ourselves. Self judgement. And as the last verse of the poem states, our right to be here is ….”no less than the trees and the stars”. At least that is how i interpret it.

    Reply

  9. theanrkiss  on June 3rd, 2011

    i Play this every day. its inspirational and its speaks good sense.
    awesome words

    Reply

  10. thmckenna  on June 3rd, 2011

    I thought this was great. But, I was more inspired by the National Lampoon spoof “Deteriorata” It’s a hoot!

    Reply

  11. mccray916  on June 3rd, 2011

    @TheAnonamoose

    Les Crane didn’t ‘steal’ the words for this poem from writer Ehrmann…He was an English professor who wanted his people to embrace the words of this poem as he had. Unfortunately, Mr. Crane assumed that because the poem had been written in 1927 that it was in the public domain and had to later pay royalties to the family. Les Crane’s 1971 spoken word version of this poem is one of the primary reasons this poem is so well known–so the family owes him a debt also.

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  12. mccray916  on June 3rd, 2011

    @TheAnonamoose

    Reply

  13. mccray916  on June 3rd, 2011

    @TheAnonamoose

    Les Crane didn’t ‘steal’ the words for this poem from writer Ehrmann…He was an English professor who wanted his people to embrace the words of this poem as he had. Unfortunately, Mr. Crane assumed that because the poem had been written in 1927 that it was in the public domain and had to later pay royalties to the family. Les Crane’s 1971 spoken word version of this poem is one of the primary reasons this poem is so well known–so the family owes him a debt also.

    Reply

  14. TheAnonamoose  on June 3rd, 2011

    Too bad he stole these words from Indiana laywer and writer Max Ehrmann who wrote them in 1927. Crane ended up paying royalties. He didn’t “exercise caution in his business affairs”. But if it inspires you to be good to others, then I guess it’s all good.

    Reply

  15. billynomatea57  on June 3rd, 2011

    if only more people live by the words

    Reply

  16. Annie1962  on June 3rd, 2011

    I resonate with most of it.. but not the part where it is stated not to compare ourselves with anyone – because there will always be people lesser and greater than ourselves.

    I disagree – we are all equal under the physical

    Reply

  17. ArtLoversStudio18  on June 3rd, 2011

    @YCSMusic
    Thank you for your prompt reply.

    Reply

  18. YCSMusic  on June 3rd, 2011

    @ArtLoversStudio18 Magix Movie Edit Pro 15 was used on this video, thanks!

    Reply

  19. ArtLoversStudio18  on June 3rd, 2011

    To YCSMusic,

    Beautiful. What editing program did you use? I love the transition between photos.

    Thank you.

    Reply

  20. Yantofullpelt  on June 3rd, 2011

    A wonderful poem & interpretation which inspires & reassures always but particularaly in times of self doubt & at any difficult time in your life.
    Many thanks

    Reply

  21. stevecowdry  on June 3rd, 2011

    Nearly 40 years on – still wonderful stuff – should be played to all teenagers today!

    Reply

  22. labeadaloca  on June 3rd, 2011

    I remember this from my high school days. I was the bullied one, and this was pretty much my only sense of self for a long time. As time turned, as it always does, nearly 30 of them later, I rediscovered this after some difficult times when adults, who I always believed knew how to play by the rules … didn’t. No wounds now, but in the noisy confusion of life … peace … it is still a beautiful world. I am striving to be happy.

    Reply

  23. fmsfryton  on June 3rd, 2011

    @trapperbt You have it in one ~ lots of individuals ~ lakes and mountains ~ children of the universe ~ oh yes and daffodils too.

    Reply

  24. YCSMusic  on June 3rd, 2011

    @trapperbt Yes that’s right.

    Reply

  25. trapperbt  on June 3rd, 2011

    Is this the Lake District that is famous for the poets Wordsworth, ,Yeats, Coleridge?

    Reply


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