Crane hits power line


This boomtruck hit a powerline with his winch cable. I watched this video at an OSHA class. I’m not sure if anyone was hurt, I hope not.

25 Responses to “Crane hits power line”

  1. burn19ballz  on April 26th, 2011

    i kicked a powerpole and it rattled a tree hangging by a thread,the tree fell taking the powerpole with it..the tree was 50ft it took out a mailbox and some line and the weirdest thing was i didn’t even kick hard,i was knocking mud off my boots and it came down,that was the weirdest fucked up thing i’ve seen in a while the wind was strong today it blew a bunch of trees down so i guess i was just there at the best/worst time. it was kinda funny,it was today.i wish i had a camera,damn! XP

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  2. GREENVK  on April 26th, 2011

    @DripsMetal @Haumiblau01 the tyres are irrelevant anyway. The metal outrigger legs are touching the ground.

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  3. DripsMetal  on April 26th, 2011

    @GREENVK

    Not against 100,000 volts of electricity they’re not….the wires themselves are coated in rubber, and you can still be electrocuted through that.

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  4. SesaiaDoriaau646  on April 26th, 2011

    ühm_áÑY_gÛys_wåNt_tÕ_chat_wÍth_mÉ

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  5. sasho54  on April 26th, 2011

    @GREENVK
    But only if clean! Look at the front of the truck – the tyres started burning.

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  6. Haumiblau01  on April 26th, 2011

    @GREENVK forget about tires as insulators. If the electricity can arc 4 inches to the crane, it can also arc 4 inches from the crane to the ground. So never trust that your tires will save you.

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  7. RayAir1  on April 26th, 2011

    Don’t you think something like that would trip a breaker? WTF

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  8. shsrah01OGC  on April 26th, 2011

    that was a waste

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  9. 1234dioxinefluoride  on April 26th, 2011

    horrible

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  10. YaterSpoon86  on April 26th, 2011

    Electrical lines will strike down the “un crane worthy”. Man that was just stupid. Here’s a clue…regardless of the techie shit….stay the fuck away from powerlines cause they will fry shit up. And for those gung ho foreman who have their head so far up the bosses ass that they can taste what they had for lunch……I won’t get just a little closer to energized lines so you either suck my pathetic little dick or fire me.

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  11. gordongate  on April 26th, 2011

    @TheMrBlinx but potential difference is the differential between the energy available between the phase and the star point/earth/neautral on thesupply transformer secondary coil.
    this is high voltage discharge, dry sand is at a low enough potential to easily allow conduction with this level of voltage, even the air which is the best insulator next to a vacuum is ionising allowing large and noisey arcs to form.

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  12. TheMrBlinx  on April 26th, 2011

    @gordongate You failed to take into consideration moisture content. Bone dry sand is not a good conductor.

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  13. nscf1000  on April 26th, 2011

    Powerlines are dangerous. Never build a house underneath them.

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  14. kengine7  on April 26th, 2011

    My apology. I was “told” earth, dirt, was poor conductor. Heard half ohm per foot was average.

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  15. gordongate  on April 26th, 2011

    @kengine7 no its not, earth is neutral with respect to live so any contact is a dead short, ie it does not have a loading resistance to reduce current flow

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  16. kengine7  on April 26th, 2011

    Dead short to common. Ground (earth) is high resistance.

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  17. TheMrBlinx  on April 26th, 2011

    @Seravajan Too much resistance to trip OCB’s (Oil Circuit Breakers). It was like a large resistor. If it were a dead short (to ground), it would have tripped out and reset two or three times (usually three) and then stayed off. But, when it’s not a dead short, the power remains on, no matter what protection they have.

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  18. TheMrBlinx  on April 26th, 2011

    Was Mr. “Don’t watch that” speaking to the camera man? If so, he was wrong. That camera screen can NOT reproduce light of the intensity required to hurt or blind anyone.

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  19. Seravajan  on April 26th, 2011

    What would happened when this power line would had falled over on the street after a pole would being hit by a car? I doubt that the safety systems (fuses and so on) would had then worked well. There are enough examples of power line threads hitting the ground and still standing under current even several minutes later!

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  20. Seravajan  on April 26th, 2011

    What I’m wondering here is, are there any safety installations on that power line? Because of the outriggerns and nearly everything else on the truck being out of metal must be a low resistance to the ground. But there is still current running thru the truck even after several minutes. This can be either: complete lack of any safety systems (which was quite common on older US electric installations) or the safety systems was faulty or not working.

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  21. gishmo827  on April 26th, 2011

    hey mr harry 46, do you know the ampacity of the cutouts upstream from the point of contact, if its a busy aera they could be as high as 500 amps, which is definatly more than was grounding out through the crane. this is a prime example of the new requirements in the 2008 edition of nfpa 72 requiring arc fault ocpd’s or breakers in dwellings, although the tecnology does not yet exsist for distribution systems, we are on the way. if you dont know what you are talking about, dont comment!!!

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  22. MrHarry46  on April 26th, 2011

    breakers should have tripped long before this happened

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  23. pkrieter  on April 26th, 2011

    Hey boss, could I get a ride back to the job. Oh, by the way do we have a spare truck :)

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  24. 0Shocker0  on April 26th, 2011

    @GREENVK Then how about companies outfitting those outriggers with heavy rubber insulated stabalizers.

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  25. DigiTan000  on April 26th, 2011

    Kids running around in the background at 1:10 and 1:20. “Whoooo! Let’s poke at it!”

    Reply


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