Circuit Skills: Power Supply


The requisite starting point for anything electronic – you won’t get much blinking, buzzing, or processing done without a power supply!

25 Responses to “Circuit Skills: Power Supply”

  1. Francis Ziegler  on March 13th, 2013

    I liked Kip, for sure. Kip was fun and original. Becky and Bre, of course, too. Actually, they’re all pretty awesome people. Make has always chose wisely. But Collin is very methodical. And I believe: if you gave the man a chimp, he could probably teach it to solder…and maybe jam on theremin too.

    Collin is a hero.

    Reply

  2. mr13579100  on March 13th, 2013

    forgetting kipkay ;P

    Reply

  3. RADIOACTIVEbaconness  on March 13th, 2013

    collin is awesome

    Reply

  4. w0mblemania  on March 13th, 2013

    @3:10 Super graphic explanation of the transformation and rectification process.

    Thank you!

    Reply

  5. RandyBuildsThings  on March 13th, 2013

    Am I the only one who thinks Colin is the lovechild of Agent Smith from The Matrix?

    Reply

  6. Rouverius  on March 13th, 2013

    7:31 Warning: Obligatory xkcd quote (#643)…
    “With great power comes great resistance times current squared”

    Reply

  7. CHOCOLATEmeter  on March 13th, 2013

    I really like the song at 1:50.

    Reply

  8. Bret Davis  on March 13th, 2013

    So if you have a +15V terminal than if you were to connect a load between that terminal and the ground terminal, you would have a 15V drop across the load. If you were to connect a load between the -15V terminal and the GND terminal you would have a 15V drop across the load (with current flowing in the opposite direction. You could connect a load between -15V and 15V and get a voltage of 30V dropped across the load.

    Reply

  9. Bret Davis  on March 13th, 2013

    When people say something is 5V or 15V or -15V, these numbers are only meaningful with a ground reference. I can have 1000V at one terminal and 1015V at another terminal and the voltage between them would be the difference, 15V (Of course those two voltages are also in reference to ground). In a circuit, ground is the point to which you compare voltages in the circuit.

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  10. poruatokin  on March 13th, 2013

    No, it is not illegal in Europe as it is sold as a kit and under EU laws, that makes the builder take the responsibility for safety. That is why some nixie clock kits that use high voltage are only sold pre-built as an option for countries outside the EU. For shipment inside the EU, only kits are supplied.

    Reply

  11. cabitothekid  on March 13th, 2013

    5:56 dubstep song XD

    Reply

  12. eelcogg  on March 13th, 2013

    Please explain…

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  13. Javed Khan  on March 13th, 2013

    Its the power that kills you. The combination of Voltage and Current.

    Reply

  14. Greg Robinson  on March 13th, 2013

    Why does this kit only use half-wave rectification? For the want of two diodes, the ripple could have been halved, and the transformer wouldn’t be as close to the saturation knee.

    Also, irresponsible to suggest that electrical tape alone provides sufficient isolation from mains power. This product should have a case that requires a tool to open. In its current state, it would be illegal in Europe or Australia.

    Reply

  15. cristian3131  on March 13th, 2013

    ok, 52 people electrocuted themselves :) )

    Reply

  16. eelcogg  on March 13th, 2013

    He didn’t say he is usign those, he just wanted an example of a circuit that needs both positive and negative rails. You are right about the ‘newer’ rail-to-rail devices, they make life easier :) Another example would be high-end transistor audio amplifiers I guess, but they seem to favor much higher voltages, both positive and negative.

    Reply

  17. Francis Ziegler  on March 13th, 2013

    Collin Cunningham’s videos never cease to impress, entertain or enlighten. He speaks with a cadence that is both patient and lucid. Frankly: I could only wish everyone was as good a teacher as he is.

    Reply

  18. Arthur Borges  on March 13th, 2013

    Yeah, OLD op amps use that voltage levels, but he could’ve used LM358, which use 5V voltage level and consume really low current, using a single little 9V battery and a 7805 linear voltage regulator to power the whole noise generator. =)

    Reply

  19. CHOCOLATEmeter  on March 13th, 2013

    i think you have this all wrong, always play with high voltage!

    Reply

  20. pianoman112233  on March 13th, 2013

    whats the difference between negative and ground?

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  21. LUVB6CPPgmodcsscoder  on March 13th, 2013

    0 to 15+ will give positive 15v.
    0 to 15- will give negative 15v.
    15+ to 15- will give 30v

    Reply

  22. eelcogg  on March 13th, 2013

    That is true, but amps are hard to measure through a human body. That’s why we used ohm’s law to calculate the maximum voltage you safely touch. It of course depends on the resistance of your skin. For dry skin, the legal maximum is 50V. Damp/wet skin will lower that to 25V. If you are submerged or soaking wet the maximum is 12V. But you are absolutely right that it is the current that kills you. That’s why the RCD in your house trips on differential current, not voltage.

    Reply

  23. eelcogg  on March 13th, 2013

    My guess would be analog circuits. Operational amplifier circuits usually require these kinds of voltages.

    Reply

  24. Frank Rizzo  on March 13th, 2013

    Volts don’t kill, AMPS do

    Reply

  25. glenwoofit  on March 13th, 2013

    Where are the fuses?

    Reply


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